Maxine Aaronson, Attorney at Law
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Estate Planning Newsletter

  • Returning Property to its Rightful Owner
    A constructive trust is a remedy imposed by a court when a person has wrongfully attained property in an inappropriate way. The court will undo the transaction and order that title to the property go to the rightful... Read more.
  • Using Non-U.S. Assets to Fund Charitable Bequests
    Taxpayers who make contributions to qualified charitable organizations are entitled to a tax benefit in the form of a charitable deduction on their income taxes. However, the issue becomes more complex when a non-U.S. citizen makes a... Read more.
  • Recent Changes in Federal Estate Taxes
    Much to the relief of many, the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (“2012 Tax Act”) was enacted in the beginning of 2013, making permanent many of the tax benefits that were scheduled to expire at the end of 2012. The... Read more.
  • Privacy Rule Protects Confidential Health Information
    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) became effective on April 14, 2003. HIPAA establishes national standards for the protection of certain health information. The purpose of HIPAA is to ensure that a... Read more.
Estate Planning News Links

Trusts & Powers of Attorney

If you become incapacitated, who is supposed to make decisions for you about the management of your property or your health care? A durable power of attorney allows someone you designate to act on your behalf. It is usually included as part of an estate plan.

A durable power of attorney is different from a non-durable power of attorney because it remains in effect even when you are incapacitated.

You are the “principal” when you create the durable power of attorney, and the “attorney-in-fact” is the person you appoint. Your attorney-in-fact may have the power to carry out all the same activities as you. An attorney-in-fact may be anyone close to you, such as a spouse, relative or close friend. In other words, an attorney-in-fact does not have to be an attorney.

Property Management

The attorney-in-fact designated for managing your property should adhere to your own standards of care. Also, this attorney-in-fact should:

  • Avoid conflicts of interest
  • Follow your directions
  • Keep regular contact with you
  • Maintain records of all transactions
Health Care

Your attorney-in-fact for health care has the duty to make health care decisions for you. Some states have simplified this process. For example, California has a Health Care Decisions Law that makes it easier to name someone to act on your behalf for medical treatment decisions.

More Than One Permitted

You may assign more than one power of attorney to carry out your property management or health care wishes. Usually, if there are 2 or more attorneys-in-fact, they must agree on what actions to take on your behalf.